Historic Sites
History Hunters Youth Reporter
Historic Sites
youth reporter
 
Stenton
Cliveden
Johnson House
Wyck
 
Stenton

Stenton
4601 North 18th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140
T/F 215-329-7312

www.stenton.org or email:education@stenton.org

Stenton, built in 1730 for James Logan, William Pennís agent, is known as one of the earliest, best-preserved and most believable historic houses in Philadelphia. Located in Philadelphia's Historic Northwest, Stenton now sits on three acres of the original 500-acre plantation. The site includes an elegant mansion, a kitchen wing, privy, barn and icehouse. The 1787 barn contains an exhibit of agricultural tools dating from the 18th and early 19th centuries. Visiting Stenton gives one a sense of what life was like in colonial times.

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Cliveden

Cliveden

Cliveden of the National Trust
6401 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19144 215.848.1777

www.cliveden.org or email: Info@cliveden.org

At Cliveden, a historic house museum in the Germantown section of Philadelphia, you can learn about a time when local families watched soldiers march through the streets and heard bullets whizzing past their front doors. Cliveden was the scene of the Battle of Germantown in October, 1777. Descendants of builder Benjamin Chew lived here until 1972. Today, Cliveden tells the story of the battle, and the family who saved this important piece of American history.

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Johnson House

Johnson House

The Johnson House Historic Site
6306 Germantown Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19144
215-438-1768

www.johnsonhouse.org or email:

Best known today as a station stop on the Underground Railroad in the 1850’s, the Johnson House was built in 1768 for the successful Quaker tanner and landowner John Johnson. During the American Revolution the house was part of the Battle of Germantown, although as pacifist Quakers, the Johnsons refused to participate in the war on either side.

During the 1850's, the Johnson's turned their house into an Underground Railroad station, and it became a crucial stop-over on the network used by runaways en route to freedom in upstate New York and Canada. Visitors to the house today can still view the attic, where runaway slaves were given a safe place to sleep overnight. Runaways also stayed in the barns, springhouse, and other outbuildings on the property. It was illegal to aid runaway slaves and the Johnson's could have faced fines and even imprisonment had they been caught. The runaways, if caught, would be returned.

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shimWyck

Wyck
6026 Germantown Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19144
215-848-1690
Fax: 215-848-1612
www.wyck.org or email: wyck@wyck.org

Historic home since 1690


Wyck was home to nine generations of the same Quaker family, the Wistars and the Haines, who owned and lived on this "farm" in Germantown. Today the wonderful colonial house with its noteworthy 1824 alterations by William Strickland, and historic gardens invites visitors to view not only remarkable collections, but to experience through the lives of its owners the changing character of Philadelphia. They personify the city's leadership in business, natural history and science, education and social responsibility.

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